Reports

Mixed Blessing? Promoting Good Governance in Kenya’s Extractive Industries

Mixed Blessing? Promoting Good Governance in Kenya’s Extractive Industries

As Kenya establishes the framework for exploitation of recent discoveries of large oil and gas deposits, the need for good governance in the sector becomes  paramount. Related experience reveals that resource-rich developing countries often face a range of challenges in translating the potential benefits from such discoveries  into  the  improved  welfare  of  their  citizens. The  result  is  that  the  abundance of natural  resources  in most  developing  countries causes  significant harm rather than  bringing  the expected benefits. This paradox where natural resource endowments occasion misery instead of plenty is well illustrated by crises in African mineral and oil exporters such as Sudan, Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Chad and Equatorial Guinea.

Download full report here

Delivering on Devolution? Evaluating County Budgets 2013-2014

Delivering on Devolution? Evaluating County Budgets 2013-2014

Foreword

One of the key features of Kenya’s constitution that was promulgated in August 2010 is the provision for a devolved government. This provision should be seen against the backdrop of inequalities, marginali- zation and poor service delivery that characterised decades of centralized governance in Kenya. While frameworks to implement  devolution have largely been put in place, diverse challenges exist a year into devolution. One year into devolution represents a good point at which to review   performance and deter- mine bottlenecks that can be resolved at this early stage. Similarly, a review of the experiences of the first year of county governments provides a useful basis to evaluate the extent to which they have adhered to the legal and institutional frameworks for managing public finances. This is important because County governments’ ability to deliver the promise of devolution depend on their efficient use of funds while preventing waste and pilferage.

Download Full Report Here

Taking Stock : Challenges and Prospects of Implementing the Constitution of Kenya, 2010

Taking Stock : Challenges and Prospects of Implementing the Constitution of Keny


The development of a new constitution was meant to redress some of the underlying governance challenges facing the Kenyan state. The risk of not addressing these governance challenges was manifested in the 2007/2008 post-election crisis. Indeed, in what was referred to as the Agenda Item Four (4), the Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation Initiative identified some of these challenges as negative ethnicity, regional imbalances, unemployment and class disparities.

Click here to download the full report

AfriCOG-KPTJ Elections 2013 Compendium

AfriCOG-KPTJ Elections 2013 Compendium

On March 4, 2014 Kenya conducted a general election, which was historic for several reasons. It was the first general election since the promulgation of the new Constitution in 2010; and it was the first election in which voters would choose candidates for six positions each, the majority of which were newly created by the Constitution. The 2013 elections also ushered in a devolved system of government. Against the background of the 2007 elections that ended in the disaster of the 2008 postelection violence, concern was high that a repeat be avoided.

Voter Registration for the 2013 General Elections in Kenya

Voter Registration for the 2013 General Elections in Kenya

On March 4, 2013, Kenya held a landmark general election. It was the first national election since the promulgation of the internationally lauded constitution, which created a devolved system of government. For the first time, Kenyans voted simultaneously for six elective offices, ranging from president to local ward representative. This election was also the first to be administered by the newly created Independent Elections and Boundaries Commission (IEBC), a body which enjoyed over 90 per cent public confidence in the lead-up to the national polls.1

Election Day 2013 and its Aftermath

On March 4, 2013 Kenya held a landmark general election. It was the first national election since the promulgation of the internationally lauded constitution, which created a devolved system of government. For the first time, Kenyans voted simultaneously for six elective offices, ranging from president to local ward representative. This election was also the first to be administered by the newly created Independent Elections and Boundaries Commission (IEBC), a body which enjoyed over 90 per cent public confidence in the lead-up to the national polls.

Kenya Governance Report - 2012

Kenya Governance Report - 2012

The Kenya Governance Report 2012 is the second in a new series by the Africa Centre for Open Governance. This report reviews events of the year 2012 as they relate to critical issues and developments in implementation of the Constitution of Kenya, 2010, governance reform and efforts against corruption. It analyses their implications and makes recommendations for the future.

Click here to download the full report

Kenya's Drought Cash Cow - Lessons from the Forensic Audit of The World Bank Arid Lands Resource Management Project

Kenyas Drought Cash Cow - Lessons from the Forensic Audit of The World Bank Ari

This report is a comprehensive review of Kenya’s Arid Lands Resources Management Project (ALRMP2). ALRMP2 was a community-based drought management project of the Kenya Government (GoK) that utilised a credit facility from the World Bank. The project had components to promote capacity building in recognition of the constraints and potential of the natural environment; generate development capacity at the community level and below to empower communities to take greater charge of their own development agenda.

Kenya's Drought Cash Cow - A Short Guide (Summary)

Kenyas Drought Cash Cow - A Short Guide

The Arid Lands Resource Management Project (ALRMP) was an extension of a World Bank funded project – the Emergency Drought Recovery Project (EDRP 1993-96) – that began in 1993. The original project, designed to address the development imbalances between Kenya’s high and low potential areas, was in 4 arid districts only: Baringo, Mandera, Turkana and Wajir. By the end of ALRMPII, in December 2010, it covered 28 arid and semi-arid land (ASAL) districts.

Click here to download the summary report

A Quick Guide to Public Participation and Parliamentary Oversight Under the New Constitution

This simple and easy to understand brief is targeted at the general Kenyan population. It highlights the problematic situations that underscore the need to have the public participate in affairs of Parliament and Parliamentary Committees. It sets out the factors that hamper public participation in the work of Parliament and Parliamentary committees and clearly sets out ways in which the public can participate in the work of Parliament and the different kinds of parliamentary committees.